Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Beating a dead horse


A sequel is now upon us, the sequel to the 2009 hit The Hangover. Todd Phillips returns to direct the sequel. Phillips other directorial credits include Due Date, Starsky & Hutch, and Old School. Is it possible for the sequel to live up to the original?

 

PLOT

Stu (Ed Helms) is getting married. Stu is set to marry a woman named Lauren (Jamie Chung). The couple agrees to get married in Lauren’s native country of Thailand. When Phil (Bradley Cooper) proposes the idea that they must have a bachelor party Stu refuses for he is afraid the same events could happen if they party once again. Phil is upset over this but he understands and agrees not to have a bachelor party.

Alan (Zach Galifianakis) is upset for he did not receive an invitation to the wedding. After Stu is nagged by Doug (Justin Bartha) to invite him, Stu eventually agrees. Stu, Phil, Alan, and Doug fly to Thailand to prepare for the wedding. Following a dinner party the crew settles on a nearby beach for a drink, with a new companion named Teddy (Mason Lee) who is Lauren’s sixteen year old brother.

The next morning the crew wakes up and finds themselves in a rundown motel with no memory of the previous night. As the crew all slowly comes to be aware of their surroundings they realize that Teddy is missing from the group. The crew now has two days to find him before the wedding.

 

STRENGTHS

What worked so well in the first movie was the chemistry between the members of the group. With this one that chemistry is still there. Also the mystery element which worked well in the first film also works well here because the audience feels like they are a member of the group. Furthermore, the funniest part of the film is the introduction of Alan. The film takes you to his house and when the audience sees his interaction as well as his unique room it is funny and entertaining.

Paul Giamatti makes a brief appearance in the film and even though his character is more of a cameo than a character, he is still funny. Giamatti is a great actor and anytime he is on the screen regardless of the role he is a treat to watch.

 

WEAKNESSES

This film is the very definition of what can be called a business comedy film. What I mean by this is since the first movie was such a success all they did this time around was repeat the same blueprint. The events are exactly the same all the movie did was substitute different people or animals.  What the film tried to do since the story was the same it took all the elements that were supposed to be funny and went too far with them. Sometimes when a movie takes the joke or the elements that are should make the audience laugh to new heights, they become unfunny. For example I have nothing against gross out jokes; however, this movie takes jokes about male private parts to a point where they are no longer funny, they become cheap.

The element of the story that did not work for me was the introduction of a monkey for comic relief. At first the monkey is funny but then the film shifts focus and turns the monkey into a smoking and drug dealing animal. Some might find this funny but I did not because it is done in bad taste and with little genuine funny moments. Moreover, the character of Chow (Ken Jeong) is brought back to this film and he has a much larger role. However, his character wears out his welcome fast especially with the way he talks.

 

CONCLUSION/FINAL RATING

Just because a movie is funny and original the first time around that does not mean it will have the same impact the second time around. Some might find the same joke funny the second time around but for me I do not find it all that funny. The Hangover, Part 2 suffers too much from jokes that are either too raunchy or they go on for too long. The film does have a case of severe sequel-itis. Some parts are funny and I did laugh out loud several times and for that I give the film credit. After all it is a comedy and I did laugh, however, I cannot bring myself to give the movie a recommendation when it does the exact same thing as its predecessor.

Written by Cole Bloxam

http://www.moviefilmreview.com/author/Cole053

 

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